Saturday, 3 September 2016

"NEW WORKS" BY KAREN COLANGELO Available for viewing and purchase NOVEMBER 2016

SURVIVAL: [ser-vahy-vuh l].  state or fact of continuing to live or exist, typically in spite of an accident, ordeal, or difficult circumstances. A natural process resulting in the evolution of structure.
The Persistent Halt
The Emerged Disappearance
Karen has always had a constant desire to create bold works that stray from conventional application methods. At a young age she used small paint brushes to apply the paint to the canvas. Over her teenage years she changed to larger brushes, palette knives or other found objects around the studio like a CD jewel case. The colours followed increasingly becoming stronger and more vibrant.
Karen’s painting style is abstract; her medium is acrylic paint on canvas. She paints the concept of Contradiction. Karen has always been attracted to bringing opposite colour combinations together and thus what would typically be an opposite is now its complement. She uses large brushes and the opposite of brushes - sheets of plexi-glass to apply her paint to her large canvases.
Her work illustrates the dance or fight of colour. She drags acrylic paint across the canvas creating interesting shapes, impact, movement, and curiosity - ultimately creating a work of art that is in its purist form.
The Horizontal Vertical
KAREN COLANGELO Takes the Concept of Contradiction into Survival Mode.
Karen’s recent work represents the theme of Contradiction illustrating opposing colours and application methods. Her work conveys either a fight or dance of colour. The final decision is left up to the viewer. It is a comment on challenges that individuals are faced with daily.
Karen tells us how the paint ‘survives’ during the painting process;
“In its purist form the paint leaves the tube and lands directly onto the painting tool. The paint is then dragged along the canvas. It has a purpose to survive by creating engaging shapes, impact, movement, and curiosity. It is happy and carefree. The paint is confident and vibrant in its appearance yet bold in its behaviour, but there are circumstances that the colours are faced with.
The colour needs to develop a controlled behaviour on the canvas surface. The colour battles with limits, patience and ultimately survival.   The paint soon realizes that its limits are being pushed, literally. As it travels and glides across the canvas, the edge is near and fast approaching.   It is decision time. It must decide to jump to the next canvas and remain in the spotlight, or it clings to the painting tool and allows its creator to decide its fate. If it falls off the canvas edge, it will try its best to leave its mark. It becomes a struggle between creator and survivor.
It is no accident when the paint decides to fall off the edge of the canvas. It intentionally marks every surface trailing its journey. The paint wants to survive and win the battle of its difficult circumstance. It decides to leave its mark by creating an eye-catching and engaging edge detail.” ~KC 

Karen extends her concept globally. “This series of work also comments on society and individuals as a whole. We all have a survival mode we all switch on when faced with challenges and life changing decisions. This mode allows us to dance or to fight our way through our battles.   We are always faced with taking a leap and jumping into something new or challenging. It is these decisions in life that need a bold, confident, and happy individual to take those chances and create positive impressions in the world, contradicting the norm.” ~KC


Artist James Maxwell works primarily in metal. He uses the techniques of industry, such as welding and machining, to create objects. His subject matter often employs the iconography of machinery and the objects they create. He is interest in form, and how ideas, once realized in three dimensions, transform. Materials, scale and surface become agents of change. By removing an object from its context, reconfiguring its composition and scale, Maxwell allows it to be something other than it was. In a sense, he is enabling us to reconfiguring ourselves.

"The use of systems is important to the work I do, both in the creation of objects and the development of ideas. Operations have orders. Yet the system does not always determine the final piece. Nor is it always employed. I am not a hostage to the orthodoxy of the original concept. Often the idea changes as the piece percolates over time and new ideas bubble up. Older ideas that keep returning are given their due and are executed. New ones sometimes jump the line." - James Maxwell